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Materials on SEDA and Digital Literacies

SEDA: Developing digital literacies; goals and achievements

Overview – helping SEDA to go appropriately digital

As well as the particular activities described below, an overarching goal of the project has been to help SEDA to go appropriately digital. Supported and encouraged by this project; and of course influenced by the many other pressures in the world to go digital; the following have been identified:

  • The SEDA Special Interest Group on Technology Enhanced Practice has been the principal route through which this project has been undertaken. The SIG is a new way of working for SEDA. Although there is already good cooperation between SEDA committees, scope remains to enhance this. The SIG helps SEDA to become a light-touch matrix organisation with consideration of technology-enhanced practice touching all of SEDA’s operations. The project is thus also an experiment in organizational change.
  • Closer working is happening between educational developers and e-learning people, converging on the enhancement of support for learning and teaching. More broadly, digital literacy provides a common theme of interest around which developers can work effectively, developing synergies and working communally with academics in the disciplines, e-learning people, administrators and student support people – bringing groups together with a common goal.
  • The SEDA community is making greater use of technology enhanced practice, through means including Twitter, Storify and blogging.
  • SEDA engagement in ‘Changing the Learning Landscape’ with the Higher Education Academy has been very successful – the main focus has been OER’s, which have a digital dimension.
  • SEDA committees are using online conferencing to ‘meet’, and thus becoming more efficient.
  • The use of online conference by committees is one way in which SEDA is consciously trying to model good technology-enhanced practice with its members, to give members the opportunity to experiment safely with such practices, and thereby to encourage members to use these methods back at their workplace. Plans for webinars are another such.
  • Several development projects around the UK, including JISC-funded projects, are using SEDA as a partner for dissemination, networking and communication.
  • SEDA has expanded its communication channels to enhance engagement with members (current and prospective) and has significantly improved its use of social media to disseminate information about events and resources relevant to the community. SEDA conferences, events and new publications are now extensively promoted via Twitter (@seda_UK_). The SEDA Twitter site now has nearly 2000 followers and has made over 1200 tweets in the last two years.
  • There is scope for more work around digital participation and the importance of fostering an understanding of online reputation management, both for academics engaged in the use of digital technologies and for their students.  This will be the theme of a 2013-14 webinar, as described below in Section 2 of the table, and may form one strand or theme for a future conference
  • There has been good collaboration across the SEDA structures, which the technology has considerably aided, on the SEDA@20 celebrations.
  • SEDA now has its own YouTube channel and has produced its first video celebrating the first 20 years of the organisation http://www.youtube.com/user/SEDAintheUK.

Edited by David Baume with contributions from project participants, to all of whom, thanks.

May 15th 2013

 Achievements related to original project goals

# SEDA areas of activity … … and how these were planned at project start to be applied to Developing Digital Literacies Progress and plans at May 2013
1 Biannual conferences An introductory session at the SEDA November 2011 conference – Using Technology to Enhance Learning – will promote the Digital Literacies programme and individual projects;

Future SEDA conferences will consider developers’ roles in the successful implementation of digital literacies

SEDA Conferences Committee is exploring the possibility of video-recording and making publicly available conference keynotes, and where possible seminar presentations.

There is now recognition of the value of recording and sharing digital outputs. Resource/support from the SEDA community (in the form of expertise) will be required in order for this to become an established activity.

A session on the project will be presented at the May 2013 SEDA Conference.

‘Creativity in education’, the theme of the November 2013 conference, will be acknowledged in its broadest sense to capture innovative approaches to learning and teaching involving the use of technology e.g. games-based learning and developing innovative means of online assessment.

Whatever the conference theme is, a growing number of sessions pay attention to the use of digital technologies.

A SEDA conference, in Autumn 2014 or Spring 2015, is being developed, exploring developers’ roles in a post-digital university.

2 One-day events on current hot topics One-day events will be run at appropriate stages of the project, some in collaboration with other professional associations  A programme of six webinars for academic year 2013-2014 is being developed, under the generic title “What developers need to know about…” Currently agreed topics are OERs, MOOCs and Social Networking, with more to come
3 SEDA’s quarterly magazine – Educational Developments Articles and updates will be published An article on a digital / development topic is being published in most issues of Educational Developments:

2013 – 14.2 Supporting academic development in the digital University – Daniel Clark (forthcoming, subject to change)

2012 – 13.4 Agents of Inter-change’: the use of student placement learning technologists – Jim Turner et al.

Academic Development for the Digital University – SEDA Summer School 2012 and 2013 – David Baume

13.3 Eight lessons for educational developers about introducing technology into educational practices – Joelle Adams

13.2 Ten years of technology in education: what have we really learned? – Helen Beetham

13.1 Employing the 3E Framework to underpin institutional practice in the active use of technology – Keith Smyth & Stephen Bruce

Technology, Feedback, Action! The potential of technology-enabled feedback – Stuart Hepplestone and Helen J. Parkin

2011 – 12.4 Twitter, SEDA and the November 2011 Conference – Sue Beckingham

12.2 – New technologies and holistic development in higher education – Lesley-Jane Gourlay

12.1 Digital voices — making stronger connections with the recorded voice – Andrew Middleton

4 SEDA’s journal, Innovations in Education and Teaching International (IETI), which maintains a strong focus on learning technologies Papers will be submitted to IETI

 

A paper is being developed by Digital Literacies projects SEDA is supporting.
5 SEDA Papers At least one SEDA Paper will be published on the development of digital literacies A proposal for such a SEDA paper is being developed by the SEDA SIG, using the activities and expertise of its members. Contents are likely to include:

Building virtual bridges, new pathways and shared development space using social media – Sue Beckingham

Bite-sized teaching for staff development – Colin Gray

Shared roles and secondments between learning technology development and academic development – Lindsay Jordan

Developing, presenting and evaluating LTA strategy using technology – Karen Strickland

Convergences between the academic development and learning technology functions, with HEDG and HeLF

6 Jiscmail lists SEDA Jiscmail lists will be a major consultation and communication method for this project Done as and when appropriate, for example to market SEDA Summer School 2013, Academic Development for the Digital University.

SEDA also makes increasing use of Twitter for such purposes.

7 SEDA-PDF professional qualifications, based on competence frameworks, now used in some 25 HEIs and colleges; Modifications to SEDA’s current qualifications will be given serious consideration; a new qualification will be introduced. The specialist outcomes for the SEDA-PDF award ‘Learning, Teaching and Assessment’ have been modified to say “Use a range of methods of teaching and supporting learning, assessment and feedback appropriate to the learners, the subject and context, including use of appropriate technologies.” (emphasis added)

Options for new and enhanced SEDA-PDF named awards in technology-enhanced practice are being scoped, for consideration by the SEDA SIG and the SEDA PDF committee, during 2013, including a possible  ‘leading digital change and innovation’ award.

8 Running courses (e.g. Summer School for new academic developers) Courses appropriate to revised and new SEDA qualifications will be developed and run This was done for the 2012 Summer School, entitled Academic Development for the Digital University. There were 24 participants, and feedback was very positive. JISC funded 50% scholarships for half of these participants. As a condition of the scholarships, reflective blogs on lessons participants took away from the Summer School were written.

The 2013 Summer School will have the same theme and title, although without Jisc scholarship funding.

9 Collaboration with other professional associations (e.g. founding, and providing the facilitator for, the Higher Education Development Community) Digital literacies will continue to be a theme for the Community;

Close collaboration with HEDG in particular is planned, around leadership in developing digital literacies

Work done by organisations within the HEDC on the development of digital literacies continue to be reported and shared at the approximately biannual HEDC meetings.

The next meeting is being planned for Summer 2013

10 Consultations and contributions to national policy and practice, including the UK Professional Standards Framework and the 2011 White Paper Learning from the current project will inform such responses to consultations and contributions

 

This will be done as and when appropriate.

 

 

For SEDA May Conference:

Handout 1 (adapted from a slightly dazzling Prezi)

Developing digitality in people and organizations

Digitality?

Digitality as individual digital literacy: By digital literacy we mean those capabilities which fit an individual for living, learning and working in a digital society. (JISC)

Digitality as organizational digital literacy: A digitally literate organization uses appropriate digital technologies to achieve its goals. Accordingly it expects, develops, resources and supports its staff to become and remain digitally literate.

Digitality as individual digital fluency: I am digitally fluent when I confidently, critically and appropriately select and use technologies to achieve my goals in the contexts in which I work and live. (Baume)

Digitality as organizational digital fluency: A digitally fluent organization actively investigates and exploits the full potential of digital technologies to identify, extend and meet its goals. Accordingly it expects, develops, resources and supports its staff to become and remain digitally fluent.

Now, please forget you ever read the word ‘digitality’!

SEDA / JISC Project: Helping SEDA to go appropriately digital; that is, appropriately to embrace the digital in its work.

How?

Outward-facing:

Educational Developments magazine: A use-of-tech related article in most issues, sometimes > 1

SEDA Briefing Paper: In preparation

SEDA Summer School: Remade as “Academic Development for the Digital University”, 2012 and 2013

Conference: Proposal for another ‘use-of-tech’ related conference being developed for 2014 (following the November 2011 ‘Using Technology to Enhance Learning’) which will demonstrate by example how new technology can be used to enhance educational development and enable participants’ own professional development.

Webinar series being planned for 2013-14: “What developers need to know about…” – likely topics to include OERs, MOOCs, Social Networking, Podcasting …

Inward-facing:

The SEDA SIG (Special Interest Group) on Technology-Enhanced Practice (not e-learning):

Informal membership; Register of members; A blog-site sedasig.wordpress.com; A member on every SEDA Committee; Sharing ideas and aiding tech-related inter-Committee co-operation; Helping SEDA to go (appropriately) digital; Progressing the work on the UKPSF Guide; Proposing events and activities; Giving SEDA a soft matrix structure

On-line committee meetings: SEDA Committees steadily making more use of on-line meetings

IETI (SEDA Journal): Using Scholar One for article handling

Co-operation: SEDA people seeing and undertaking greater co-operation with e-learning people

What implications does this have for your organization or institution?

Evaluation questions for SEDA Committees

These evaluation questions directly address the goals that SEDA established in the early stages of the project. They are addressed primarily to SEDA Committees through their Chairs and SEDA SIG members.

Outward facing:

  1. In what particular ways is SEDA supporting the development of the digital literacies, both of its members and of the users of its services?
  2. How effective is this support proving?
  3. Both within and beyond the work of your Committee, what bridges have you seen being built between the academic development and learning technology functions?
  4. What co-operation between your Committee and organisations outside SEDA on digital literacies have you seen?

Inward-facing:

  1. To your knowledge, in what particular ways is SEDA appropriately a more digital organisation than it was two years ago?
  2. What main factors have led to these changes?
  3. What co-operation between your Committee and other SEDA Committees on digital literacies have you seen or prompted?

Knowing that some of this movement would have happened with or without the project:

  1. What particular     contribution has your Committee, your own work and the work of the project made? (We know academic development is a very collaborative business, but this is no time for modesty. This is the time to make and justify claims to achievements.)
  2. What future plans do you and your Committee have that will aid the  development of digital literacies and help SEDA to go more digital?
  1. What else would you like to say about any of this?

What implications do these evaluation questions have for your own organization or institution?

David Baume with Peter Hartley, david@davidbaume.com, May 2013

Handout 2

Evaluation questions for SEDA Committees

These evaluation questions directly address the goals that SEDA established in the early stages of the project. They are addressed primarily to SEDA Committees through their Chairs and SEDA SIG members.

Outward facing:

  1. In what particular ways is  SEDA supporting the development of the digital literacies, both of its members and of the users of its services?
  2. How effective is this support proving?
  3. Both within and beyond the work of your Committee, what bridges have you seen being built between the academic development and learning technology functions?
  4. What co-operation between your Committee and organisations outside SEDA on digital literacies have you seen?

Inward-facing:

  1. To your knowledge, in what particular ways is SEDA appropriately a more digital organisation than it was two years ago?
  2. What main factors have led to these changes?
  3. What co-operation between your Committee and other SEDA Committees on digital literacies have you seen or prompted?

Knowing that some of this movement would have happened with or without the project:

  1. What particular contribution has your Committee, your own work and the work of the project made? (We know academic development is a very collaborative business, but this is no time for modesty. This is the time to make and justify claims to achievements.)
  2. What future plans do you and your Committee have that will aid the development of digital literacies and help SEDA to go more digital?
  1. What else would you like to say about any of this?

David Baume, david@davidbaume.com, May 2013

Handout 3

Good pedagogic policy and practice:

1. Encourage contacts between students and staff
2. Foster both individual and social learning
3. Foster both formal and informal learning
4. Promote the active engagement of the learner and emphasize time on task
5. Provide prompt, constructive, usable and valid feedback
6. Provide an explicit scaffolding or structure around which learning can happen
7. Communicate clear and high expectations for a lifetime of ethical learning, work and service in changing times.
8. Respect diverse talents and ways of learning
9. Depend on the continuing learning of all those who support the learning of others.
10. Demand consistent policy frameworks with support for learning as their primary focus.

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